Julije Knifer | Mia Marfurt | Grear Patterson

Zig Zag

13th June - 18th July 2015

Honolulu, Honolulu Gallery, HonoluluGallery, HonoluluZurich, Honolulu Zurich, Zurich

Honolulu is proud to announce the inaugural show Zig Zag with Julije Knifer (1924 – 2004), Mia Marfurt (1985 – ), and Grear Patterson (1988 – ). This exhibition brings together three artists of different generations and geographies, combining their mutual obsession with form, structure and inherent reduction.
Born in Zagreb in 1924, Julije Knifer was one of the founding members of the Gorgona Group. The Croatian avant-garde art group was active between 1959 and 1966 and set their goal to overcome the traditional academic idea of what an artwork should be. Julije Knifer was engrossed with his entire artistic life on one form: the meander. He called these works Anti-paintings, exploring the infinite possibilities of a simple zigzagging line that resulted in the maximum reduction of the idea of painting.
The young Zurich based artist Mia Marfurt explores the monumental impact of sculpture by pushing the boundaries of the possibilities of production techniques. For the work  T- Struktur (Studie 2), 2015 she combined glass, aluminum, glue, silicone, and Epson Ultrachrome Ink to create a startling optical experience using conventional building materials. The sculpture has the potential to be extended, amplified and altered, thereby exploring symbolic modes of construction and, indeed, deconstruction.
An obsession with reducing to the maximum is also inherent in Grear Patterson’s work. Born in 1988 in Redding, Connecticut, Grear now lives and works in New York City. His exhibited ‘Tank’ works reference deadly weapons in a childlike manner while reducing their shape to three composed canvases. Although the works are seemingly innocent compositions, the tanks hark back to constructivist and concrete painters of the early 20th century.
By reducing form, color, and structure, all three artists attain an extreme form of clarity. The act of reducing to the point of ambiguity creates a state of mind where anything is possible. With this unsettling yet fascinating nihilistic approach, the motif is simultaneously a signifier of everything and nothing.
This exhibition has come together thanks to the amazing support of the Julije Knifer Estate and the Gallery Frank Elbaz. Honolulu would like to give special thanks to Ana Knifer, Danka Sosic, Frank Elbaz, Rudi Rock, Mia Marfurt, Scipio Schneider, and Grear Patterson.

Julije Knifer
AP 4, 2003
Acrylic on canvas
60 x 60 cm (23 ⅝” x 23 ⅝”)

Grear Patterson
Ruby, 2015
Canvas and tarpaulin in three parts
69.9 x 161.75 x 6.3 cm (27 ½” x 63 ⅝” x 2 ½”)

Grear Patterson
Mid Points, 2015
Canvas and tarpaulin in three parts
69.9 x 161.75 x 6.3 cm (27 ½” x 63 ⅝” x 2 ½”)

Julije Knifer
AP XL, 2003-2004
Acrylic on canvas
100.3 x 100 cm (39 ½” x 39 ⅜”)

Julije Knifer
Untitled, 1981
Graphite on paper
61 x 46 cm (24″ x 18 ⅛”)